loader image
La Piccioletta Barca - Issue 19
Theorem

Theorem

The pursuit of knowledge and excellence, mastery at its highest degrees, makes for an arduous and confounding path, a befuddling pastime and downright harrowing proposition to boldly elect and make one’s life’s work.

Theorem (THUMBNAIL) - Jerome Berglund

A striking literary analogue might be Kafka’s the Castle, the entrance to which his identifiable protagonist devotes a lifetime to stubbornly chasing.

In this selection of photographs, I endeavored to reconnoiter that intimidating undertaking, snip out a few striking moments and telling visualizations, of feelings characteristic to such fruitful if taxing explorations, through soupy mist.

Consider me Virgil, and allow me to usher you across the wastes obligatory to traverse, if ones strives toward reaching the loftiest, most astonishing heights…

 

Jerome Berglund graduated from the cinema-television production program at the University of Southern California, and has spent much of his career working in television and photography. He has had photographs published and awarded in local papers and last year staged an exhibition in the Twin Cities area which included a residency of several months at a local community center. The most recent show featuring his pictures, at the Pause Gallery in New York, opened in early December.

 

 

Spo-de-odee

Spo-de-odee

AngelStand

 

It’s funny how the old arts persevere, and in the quaintest bunghole of suburban Minnesota, some fetid gutter in a Korea Town slum, an insignificant pool of standing water in Iowan flyover country, on a nursing home curio shelf, ancient traditions life on, triumph modestly, imperceptible, unsung.

But let’s be better than those many other Philistines, we. Make an effort to have keener eyes, more perceptive grasps of history, appreciate the potent archetypes, how they recur and transmit, reproduce almost virulently. Fortunately, these patterns’ replication, persistent prevalence is worth celebrating, applauding, glorying about, rather.

So that, with effort, we may at last exult in finding acquaintance with a truth, hidden carefully in plain sight: that Ancient Greece, and the Victorian English countryside, are not, in fact, always so distant as we might imagine them to be, at a given moment. Sometimes, if we remain aware most vigilantly, keep our eyes sufficiently peeled, we will find such distant destinations may be the merest few steps away, to our profound amazement, in defiance of whatever expectations we may have internalized, assumptions of supposed modernity and the march of progress, leaving jewels of the past by the wayside. But no, the laws of physics assure us matter is never created, nor destroyed. It just changes shape, evolves in form, shifts phases, turns from liquid to gaseous. More often, rather than demolition, treasures become buried. That is a most fortuitous windfall, for it means their return demands only a tenacious archaeologist to unearth them, dust off the sediment and lift these wonders from their hideaways, return them to deserved, long omitted light, to profound public benefit and appreciation.

“Wine Spo-Dee-O-Dee” was popularized by famed underaged-cousin marrier and wife-drowner Jerry Lee Lewis. It was written and first recorded by “Sticks” McGhee, who borrowed the chorus from Samuel Theard. He reportedly composed the song basing it upon chants he became familiar with from a basic training boot camp, during his time in the service. Now, let me ask you this. Were you blessed with immortality, long ago had been privileged enough to walk those ancient Grecian meadows of old, in their heyday, by the moonlight, do you not imagine you might have overheard some bacchants at worship before the altars of Dionysus, writhing in a campfire’s glow, chanting something perhaps in a very different tongue, yet nonetheless strikingly similar?

 

Jerome Berglund graduated from the cinema-television production program at the University of Southern California, and has spent much of his career working in television and photography. He has had photographs published and awarded in local papers and last year staged an exhibition in the Twin Cities area which included a residency of several months at a local community center. The most recent show featuring his pictures, at the Pause Gallery in New York, opened in early December.

Beekeeping

Beekeeping

Bee-keeping.jpg

Plants have always been a favorite subject of mine, to photograph or write about, to endeavor to keep alive and coax into thriving. I have a tattoo of a flower on my arm even.

Their symbology, in the language of the visual, the meanings imparted through different usages, has further always captivated my imagination, in a multitude of ways. One passage which stayed with me since adolescence was a certain line in Hamlet about an ‘unweeded garden gone to seed’. Juxtaposing that with the alternative, of flourishing, verdant, lovingly maintained landscapes, restored wastelands anticipated when the Fisher King finally transmits his holy Grail, Arthur rises again, Merlin is freed from his arboreal prison, all of these stories and vested meanings within them I find so enchanting, of such extraordinary interest, that I pay especial attention and invest particular energy in documenting striking examples in nature which fit into their rich and storied traditions and frameworks.

Bees are a vital component of all such systems, as the protectors and conveyors, who perform that critical step of caretaking and promoting fecund proliferation of plant life, fertilizing and pollinating, facilitating and enabling reproduction. When their existence is jeopardized, bee numbers dwindle, so all life and growth on this planet become threatened.

Happening upon this scene and composing the above photo, I was reminded and hoped to subtly gesture towards how important bees are, the critical foundational purposes they fulfill in propping up our entire ecosystem, to draw attention to their recent plight and foster awareness of the primacy of ensuring different species’ preservations. If not for the benefit of the insects themselves, or to cultivate the flowers they steward, for that next generation of people, not to mention our own.

To me, these flowers looked like they were yearning for connection. Reaching out almost…

 

Jerome Berglund graduated from the cinema-television production program at the University of Southern California, and has spent much of his career working in television and photography. He has had photographs published and awarded in local papers and last year staged an exhibition in the Twin Cities area which included a residency of several months at a local community center. The most recent show featuring his pictures, at the Pause Gallery in New York, opened in early December.

Pin It on Pinterest