Konstantinos Doxiadis

I’m a third-year philosophy undergraduate at Cambridge interested in philosophy of language and formal logic, with an emphasis on the relation between formal and natural languages. When not writing about philosophy or logic (which I suspect will be quite often!), I will be focusing on prose and verse, where my main aim is to investigate the malleability of voice in narrative, and what effects this has on literary works. At times I may also write essays/commentaries on writers who I feel manage to do this successfully, such as: T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Basil Bunting, and others.

Ilúvatar, Tolkien and Christianity

In many ways, The Silmarillion is J.R.R. Tolkien’s magnum opus, spanning from the genesis of his universe to the events that we have grown familiar to in The Lord of the Rings. Comprised of five independent sections, completed and collated posthumously by his son, Christopher Tolkien, the gargantuan project draws heavily from Tolkien’s deeply held religious convictions, as well as his academic background in Norse mythology and linguistics. The combination of these elements allowed Tolkien to construct an incredibly complex monotheistic system, whose creator, Ilúvatar, possesses flaws and imperfections conventionally found in pagan deities.

read more

For The Stones Speak In The Darkness

Spin your yarn amidst the rubble, he whimpered to himself, curling up against the wall. His platter was still on the ground beside the door, cold and untouched. It had been days since his appetite left him; the mug of water he drank every morning more than sufficient to stave away the pain. Some mornings, he would force himself to tear away at the stale bread, chewing the dough into a mushy pulp.

read more

A Seereeyus Kerakter

How fortunate the poet was to be blind and not deaf   You wished for the wee wind, Ezra, To sweep your words As leaves unto the sky And the wind did come For the old voice lifted itself Weaving an endless sentence You wished for the lamp, Ezra, To guide your path As stars […]

read more

Autumn Leaves

I still remember that night at Okishi Ozawa, the way time seemed to ebb and flow with the light. I was a young man then, or at least, much younger than I am now, but I do not think the added years would have changed anything.

read more

An experiment in Japanese form

He arrived at noon, trudging up the road with a black duffel bag slung over his shoulder. I never asked him how he got here. The station was much too far away to walk from, and he must have been completely exhausted. Perhaps the army truck dropped him off, or he might have taken a cab. But if that was so, why didn’t they leave him at the door?

read more

Muuusee

The ‘muse’ we call her, and then we wait. God knows what we wait for. We wait for inspiration, as though it should spring from her fingers. As though it should flow from her lips; from her figure, which sways against the shadow’s respite.

read more

A vignette for monolingual poems

What does it mean for something to be untranslatable? And perhaps the more interesting question is: Why are some works untranslatable? In this essay I will approach both these questions from a personal perspective, structuring and formalising my intuitions in a manner which I hope will lead to a coherent response.

read more

Jabberwocky Demystification

What always amazed me about Lewis Carroll’s Jabberwocky is not that the poem is centred around nonsense words, but rather, that the nonsense words integrate into the rest of the poem in such a way that the reader feels no urge to inquire into their meanings.

read more

The Hollow Man

Jan Nielsen was lying in the bathtub, his eyes, tightly shut. It had been over a year since he had submitted something for publication, the past months riddled with sub-par drafts and manuscripts, whose unfortunate fates were apparent from the very first line.

read more

Giovanni

She had often teased him for being two years younger, perpetually chasing to catch up, but as Giovanni was trampling across the pebbled beaches of Positano, Lucia drew her last breath.

read more